London Calling! 2 VC panel & networking events: Brexit & CVC

London Calling! 2 VC panel & networking events: Brexit & CVC

ShareRubicon Venture Capital together with Baker Botts is organizing two VC events open to the public. September 27th: http://BrexitVC.eventbrite.com September 29th: http://CVCLondon.eventbrite.com Join us for dinner, drinks and networking September 29th for Investor All Stars 2016 now in its 14th year and the most exclusive gathering of VCs in London. We will head over directly following our CVC event the 29th. Please join us for one or both events. All of our events focus on a cool topic with an all-star VC panel with plenty of time for networking, drinks and canapés. Nothing better than a room filled with elite entrepreneurs and VCs pitching each other over drinks and food. Everyone attending the CVC event will get a copy of my new CVC book – Masters of Corporate Venture Capital. We have already registered over 50 VCs and active angel investors for these events including all star VC panelists. Rubicon General Partners Andrew Romans and Joshua Siegel will be taking private meetings September 26 – Oct 1 meeting with LP investors (HNWI / angel investors, family offices, corporate LPs & institutional investors). See you in London!...
My new book on Corporate Venture Capital is finished

My new book on Corporate Venture Capital is finished

ShareAfter nearly two years of research, 100+ interviews and countless hours of work, my new book on Corporate Venture Capital is finished…not to mention my own experience of raising CVC funding when I was an entrepreneur. You can find it on: Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com, Amazon.de, Amazon.fr, Amazon.it,Amazon.es. The book is being converted for Kindle now and should be available on Kindle within a month. It should appear in book stores and libraries in a few weeks. Check it out here and please leave me a review if you like it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/1530088690 The first event will be in London where we are hosing a CVC panel and networking event with all the trimmings! If you are a CVC in London, SF or NYC pls get in touch to join the panel. http://CVCLondon.eventbrite.com Rubicon is also hosting a second event that week in London with VCs discussing the changes with Brexit. http://BrexitVC.eventbrite.com. We are also taking meetings with corporates, family offices, HNWI angel investors and institutional LPs. We are still finalizing dates and venues for the same event in SF and NYC. Please contact me if you want to host or sponsor a similar event anywhere worldwide. Our typical format is networking, VC panel, quick talk sharing findings of my research and then plenty of time for networking, food and drinks bringing together entrepreneurs, angels, VCs, family offices and corporates. Hope to see you in London, SF or New York this fall! I’m also doing a lot of traveling to Asia and the Middle East; so get in touch! We work in a very complex ecosystem and this book captures stories that bring the complexity to life with...
Secondaries: how founders and early investors can sell shares before the liquidity event of the startup

Secondaries: how founders and early investors can sell shares before the liquidity event of the startup

ShareVCs and angels invest in companies early stage with the plan of getting to an IPO or M&A event exiting their investment at a much higher valuation than the one they invested at. You win some and lose some, but net net you make money. At least that’s the plan for venture capital and angel investing. In the past few years it has become possible for founders and early investors to sell some or all of their position prior to the definitive liquidity event of the company. Smart investors should take advantage of this or at a minimum understand this and possibly sell some of their position when there is a huge uptick in the valuation of the startup they invested in. If Peter Thiel sold some of his shares in Facebook prior to the IPO I think you can get in line and do the same. Experienced investors have invested into deals and watched their unrealized gain go up and up and up, but before the actual exit the valuation collapses. There are actually a million ways to lose everything. For some investors selling something prior to the big exit makes sense. This is simply experience talking to you. Understanding secondaries is a part of the puzzle every angel and VC should understand. I used to operate in this space and I have a vast amount of experience in the ever changing secondary market for tech venture capital. My experience in this area drives some of the strategy at Rubicon Venture Capital. With the permission of McGraw Hill, publisher of my first book, I can share with you...
Understanding VC Target Ownership Percentages

Understanding VC Target Ownership Percentages

ShareVCs often have target ownership percentages that are driven by two things: 1) ability for each investment to return 100%, 50% or 25% of their entire VC fund and 2) a VC can only be effective on so many boards; so may as well join the board of the companies where they own a meaningful amount of equity. Many VCs have a minimum ownership percentage they target when making investments. Depending on the stage the VC invests at and their strategy it is often seeking to own at least 20% of the company when leading a Series A investment, buying 10% of the company in a Series B when the A investors want half of the B round and maybe 5% of the company when joining a syndicate of a few different investors in a Series C. Many VCs will want to take 20% regardless of stage and walk away from an A, B or C round if they can not buy at least 20% or 15% of the company at that time. In ancient times (80’s, 90’s and early 2000’s) these numbers were a bit bigger with VCs seeking to own 33% minimum and even lifting that up to 45%. With the power in recent years moving from the investor to the entrepreneur the amount a startup is willing to sell in a single round has gravitated downwards to 20% and goes up a bit to make room for many elbowing VCs trying to get in. With the macro economy cooling things off we may see startups moving back to selling a third in a single financing again...
We are in a new venture economic cycle in 2016

We are in a new venture economic cycle in 2016

ShareAt Rubicon Venture Capital we believe 2016 is already a new and different economic cycle from 2015 and 2014 for startups and VCs trying to agree on appropriate valuations and size of financings. The venture economy ebbs and flows much like the public markets, but not as tightly in tune as logic might suggest. Startup CEOs have their own idea of what their valuations should be and how much capital they should raise and how often. Venture capitalists have their own ideas on the same topics and deals get done when both sides agree. Our take is that the venture world has been in an upward boom in recent years and peaked in August of 2015. There was a “Chinese chill” in August followed by a controlled “hitting of the breaks” without skid marks in September, October, November and December. What has happened with venture is a mild market correction; however, not all entrepreneurs or VCs have gotten the news yet. As we all know 2016 began with a hammering of the global public equity markets. Some of our companies already restructured in 2015 cooling burn rates and recapping their companies at more humble valuations raising funding when they didn’t need it. Funding has become more of a continuous process than big forklift monumental “series” financings. Now many mid to late stage companies are lowering expenses, lowering growth expectations, raising more capital ahead of schedule and adopting new operating plans to sail through potential rough waters that may be ahead. What does this mean for Rubicon? Lower valuations for us to invest in. Ability to drag startups through more...